Developmental milestones at 8 to 24 months :

look at your child go! He’s become an explorer , and it may astonish you how rapidly he can get around when he crawls or scoots. He can sit on his own now and gets anything he can to pull himself up to standing and “cruise.” He may even make some solo strides before his first birthday celebration.

His jabbering sounds increasingly like genuine discussion, and you’ll hear his first words – regularly “mother” or “dada.” Soon he’ll talk in straightforward expressions, yet meanwhile he utilizes signals to demonstrate what he needs – or doesn’t need! – and gives close consideration to your words.

His hands are progressively agile: He interests himself placing things in compartments and taking them out once more. He can utilize his thumb and finger in a pincer handle to eat finger nourishment. Your infant wants to be much the same as you by brushing his hair, drinking from a cup, and pretending to talk on the telephone.

While he may seem outgoing, he’s probably reserved around strangers. And when you leave him, he may become distraught – separation anxiety is normal at this age.

Your role:


Keep conversing with your infant:

  • This is a crucial time for his language advancement.
  • Describe your daily schedule, what you’re doing now and what you will do straightaway, and what you see.
  • Describing how you think your infant is feeling causes him learn feelings.
  • Continue perusing together and play peekaboo, find the stowaway, and turn-taking games.
  • As he gets more active (increasingly dynamic), it’s imperative to give a sheltered space to explore (investigate).
  • He may not be strolling yet, however you can assist him with preparing by holding him such that puts weight on his legs or by propping him facing the couch.
  • Focus on what he appreciates, and give him the opportunity to utilize every one of his faculties to play and find.
  • Offer him colored pencils and paper, stacking squares, empty nourishment compartments, and pots and skillet to play with.
  • Be respectful of his separation anxiety: Build trust by giving him time to get used to new caregivers and always saying goodbye before you leave.


Red flags:


Each child develops at his own pace, but talk to your child’s doctor if your baby:

  • Doesn’t crawl.
  • Appears to drag one side while he’s creeping for a month or more.
  • Can’t stand with help.
  • Baby can’t say any words.
  • Doesn’t employ signals, for example, shaking his head “no” and pointing.
  • On to the next stage: 13 to 24 months.

Milestones- 13 to 24 months:

In his subsequent year, your little child will become certain on his feet: Those first unbalanced advances set him on course to walk without anyone else, go all over stairs, remain on his pussyfoots, kick a ball, and perhaps run when he turns 2.

As you realize what achievements your baby is probably going to ace this year, remember this is just a rule. Every kid is one of a kind and creates at his own pace. There’s a wide scope of what’s viewed as typical, and you likely don’t should be concerned except if you notice one of the warnings depicted beneath.

In his subsequent year, your little child will become certain on his feet: Those first unbalanced advances set him on course to walk without anyone else, go all over stairs, remain on his pussyfoots, kick a ball, and perhaps run when he turns 2.

He’ll also become quite the climber, scrambling onto sofas and chairs.

His language aptitudes are developing, however, he sees beyond what he can communicate. By year and a half, he can say at any rate a few single words, and by two years he utilizes words in short expressions and sentences.

He rapidly gets new words from the books you read resoundingly to him and from hearing regular discussions. He can follow two-advance bearings, for example, “Get your book and carry it to me.”

Your little child is beginning to distinguish shapes and hues. He writes with a colored pencil, fabricates towers of at least four squares, tosses a ball, and appreciates filling and purging holders. You might notice the first signs that indicate whether he’ll be left- or right-handed.

Your little child is beginning to distinguish shapes and hues. He writes with a colored pencil, fabricates towers of at least four squares, tosses a ball, and appreciates filling and purging holders. You may see the principal signs that show whether he’ll be left-or right-gave.

He may begin to show interest in learning how to utilize a bathroom. He’ll have a fabulous time mirroring you by chatting on a play telephone, “taking care of” a doll, or claiming to drive a vehicle.

Separation anxiety peaks midyear, and by 24 months he’ll be more comfortable playing alongside other children and spending time with other caregivers. Meanwhile, he’ll grow increasingly independent – and possibly defiant.

Your role:

  • Encourage his verbal abilities by articulating emotions, suggesting conversation starters, discussing the books you read together, asking his assessment, and addressing his inquiries concerning his general surroundings. Begin encouraging him letters and numbers.
  • Be mindful so as not to chasten him for utilizing words inaccurately – just effectively rethink what he said. At the point when he focuses on something he needs, brief him to request it. Work on distinguishing the pieces of his body and naming recognizable items.
  • Energize imagine play with dolls and play nourishment. Request that he help sort toys by placing them incomparable classifications, for example, red toys or delicate toys. Let him practice feeding himself with a cup and utensils.
  • As he increases new abilities, investigate your home and change your childproofing procedure so he can investigate unreservedly and securely.

Red flags:


Each child develops at his own pace, but talk to your child’s doctor if your toddler:

  • Can’t walk by 18 months.
  • Doesn’t understand the use of everyday objects.
  • Doesn’t speak at least six words by 18 months or two-word sentences by 24 months.
  • Loses skills he previously had.
  • Doesn’t follow simple instructions.
  • Doesn’t imitate words and actions.

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